Defeating AIDS — Advancing global health

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Towards a new global development agenda

As the world seeks to define a new development agenda and accountability framework, we must seize the opportunity to protect the achievements of the AIDS response on our journey towards the end of AIDS, and to usher in a new era of social justice, health and sustainable development.

The Commission

To bring this debate to the global arena, The UNAIDS and Lancet Commission: Defeating AIDS — Advancing global health has been established. Through a dynamic programme of think-tank consultations, together with online crowd-sourcing and direct engagement with constituencies, the Commission will deliberate on strategies to ensure that the vision of the global AIDS movement, zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths, can be realised in the coming decades. The Commission also seeks to ensure that the principles and achievements of the AIDS response inform a more equitable, effective and sustainable global health agenda.

The first meeting of the Commission was held in Lilongwe, Malawi on 28-29 June, 2013, hosted by Commission Co-Chair, President Joyce Banda of the Republic of Malawi. The second and final meeting of the Commission was held in London, UK, on 13-14 February 2014. The Commission is currently working on its final Report, which is expected to be launched in 2015.

Co-Chairs

  • H.E. Joyce Banda, Former President of the Republic of Malawi
  • Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, Chair of the African Union Commission
  • Professor Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Three central questions

The Commission will deliberate on the following three questions:

  • What will it take to end AIDS?
  • How can lessons from the AIDS response inform global health?
  • How must the global health and AIDS architecture be modernised to achieve sustainable global health?

Outcomes of the Commission

  • Evidence. A special report in The Lancet as well as on-going coverage in The Lancet of interim findings.
  • Awareness. Greater awareness among key opinion leaders of the contributions of the response to broader global health outcomes and sustainable development, and the rationale for a prominent positioning of HIV in the post-2015 agenda and accountability framework.
  • Mobilisation. Higher level of commitment to action on the part of individuals, civil society, businesses, institutes, and governments and momentum for a transformation in global health through public dialogue and political mobilisation.