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Disproportionate impact of HIV on men who have sex with men in US underlines need for better outreach

18 March 2010

Данная информация на русском языке отсутствует.
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New data analysis released on 10 March by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlights that HIV and syphilis disproportionately impact men who have sex with men in the United States (U.S.).

New data analysis released on 10 March by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlights that HIV and syphilis disproportionately impact men who have sex with men in the United States (U.S.).
The data, presented at CDC's 2010 National STD Prevention Conference, found that the rate of new HIV diagnoses among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the U.S. is more than 44 times that of other men and more than 40 times that of women.

"While the heavy toll of HIV and syphilis among gay and bisexual men has been long recognized, this analysis shows just how stark the health disparities are between this and other populations," said Kevin Fenton, M.D., Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. "It is clear that we will not be able to stop the U.S. HIV epidemic until every affected community, along with health officials nationwide, prioritize the needs of gay and bisexual men with HIV prevention efforts."

According to CDC many aspects contribute to the high rates of HIV and syphilis among gay and bisexual men in this country. Homophobia and stigma can prevent MSM from seeking prevention, HIV testing and counselling, and treatment services. Other causes include limited access to prevention services, unsafe sex practices and complacency about HIV risk due to existence of treatment, particularly among young gay and bisexual men.  Also, the risk of HIV transmission through anal sex is much greater than the risk of transmission via other sexual activities.

''It seems like we have come full circle in the United States,'' said UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé. ''Efforts must be redoubled to include gay and bisexual men in AIDS programming and reach out to and address the HIV prevention needs of all men who have sex with men.'' 
Prevention programmes

According to UNAIDS, HIV prevention measures for men who have sex with men should include consistent and proper use of condoms, and access to water-based lubricants. High quality HIV-related services, like voluntary counseling and testing in a non-discriminatory environment,, should be made available as well as specific and targeted information on prevention and risk reduction strategies designed to appeal to and meet the needs of men who have sex with men. Further quality treatment for sexually transmitted infections with referral for HIV services must be made available.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services notes that in the United States men as a whole, are less likely to use the health care system than women. Men often seek care when they are experiencing critical health problems. Men who have sex with men who do not access health care may not know they are infected with HIV or an STD, thus compromising their own health status. The persistence of stigma and homophobia compounds the situation still further.

CDC officials noted that the new analysis underscores the importance of the HIV and STD prevention efforts to reach gay and bisexual men recently announced as part of the U.S. President's fiscal year 2011 national budget proposal.

The new analysis is the first step in more fully assessing the extent of HIV among MSM and other populations in the United States. The CDC is developing more detailed estimates of infection rates among MSM by race and age, as well as among injection drug users. Ultimately, these data can be used to better inform national and local approaches to HIV and STD prevention to ensure that efforts are reaching the populations in greatest need.